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Paul Watson (Sea Shepherd Conservation Society) Interview

Most of you know by now that the International Justice court in The Hague recently ruled in favor of Australia and New Zealand, and against Japan regarding the killing of whales under the guise of “Research.”   Bill Maher’s subsequent interview with Paul Watson, founder of Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, was expected to be spent talking about the decision.   A few minutes were spent on that, but within the following video, they went a lot further.  No one to date has ever done such a fine, eloquent and concise job of describing the state of the oceans and the consequences of continuing to do things as we’ve been doing them. Read more

Pete Bethune Interview : Part One

Pete Bethune Interview – Part One:

Recently John Taylor from Protect The Ocean got a chance to chat with Pete Bethune. The session has been turned into several videos, which we are editing at this very moment and hope to be able to provide to you shortly.  A transcription and additional details will be posted as they become available.

First, a preface from JT:  People sometimes look at this as an awesome life, working on issues that matter (to us and the world,) being involved, in the heart of things.  To be honest, it’s a job (per se) like any other.  We who do it are glad that we’re able to, but we tend to see it as what we do, just like anyone else.  It’s kinda like Tia Marie Torres from “Pitbulls and Parolees” says, “It is my hope that one day I won’t have to.”  Not a one of us has any higher a hope than to live in a world where what we work towards is an everyday thing — where people are always conscious and responsible about their impact on the planet, the freshwater and oceans of the world, and are caring and considerate towards the creatures that live in and on this earth, people amongst them.  Until that happens, we who work towards those ends have no real choice but to keep up the fight, do do what we can, whatever we can, to save the planet and all that lives here from what looks to be a certain and impending destruction.  Some realistic estimates say that unless we are successful very soon, this earth’s oceans have just a couple decades, a score of years left to live. Read more