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Lionfish Light The Way

picture of a Red Lionfish

The Red Lionfish, with its graceful fins and venomous spines, is creating a very serious problem since its invasion of the Gulf and Mediterranean waters.

As some of you may know, the Lionfish is a warm-water species from the Indo-Pacific waters.  Sporting venomous spines, they are a generalist, eating everything from fish nearly half their size, to crustaceans, shrimp, etc.  Having been introduced in the early 1990’s off the coast of Florida, they are taking over the Gulf and Caribbean waters.  Their venomous spines are an adaptation that indigenous species have no means of dealing with.  Their presence has been devastating to an already challenged ecosystem.  Starting from that one spot in Florida, and tracing back genetically to just 6 or 8 females released into the Gulf’s waters, they now cover a vast range, covering the entire Gulf and Caribbean region (see image further below.  As generalists, they are destroying the balances of nature, consuming and growing unchecked.  Sturdy, these beautiful fish are akin to the red-tailed hawks of North America; they can live on most anything and thrive in many conditions.  Their only bottleneck now is cooler waters; They don’t seem able to withstand waters further north, so spreading to the UK along the Gulf Stream is unlikely.  Read more

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More Deadly Gulf Lies – About Seafood This Time

The “Gulf Science Monitor” (Issue 6) recently delivered this gem into my Protect The Ocean email inbox. It claims that NOAA and the FDA have developed a new test to detect Corexit in seafood. According to the email and report, all the seafood in reopened waters is safe to eat. How can I tell they’re lying to me? THEIR LIPS ARE MOVING!

Corexit was reported to be lethal to fish fry at just 2.6 ppm over 96 hours. Yet in the second paragraph in the Gulf Science Monitor announcement, they claim that 100 ppm is safe for finfish, but 500 PPM is safe for shrimp, crabs and oysters. WHAT?! Maybe they think we’re five times as stupid. The U.S. government now claims that 50 times that concentration is safe for people who eat finfish, and 250 times that is supposedly safe for those who eat shrimp? I don’t believe it, people — not for a minute! Read more

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What’s in Corexit — from the Horse’s Mouth

Here’s a list of what is reported to be the chemical components in Corexit:

Chemical Name

  • 1,2-Propanediol
  • Ethanol, 2-butoxy- (only in Corexit 9527)
  • Butanedioic acid, 2-sulfo-, 1,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl) ester, sodium salt (1:1)
  • Sorbitan, mono-(9Z)-9-octadecenoate
  • Sorbitan, mono-(9Z)-9-octadecenoate, poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) derivs.
  • Sorbitan, tri-(9Z)-9-octadecenoate, poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) derivs
  • 2-Propanol, 1-(2-butoxy-1-methylethoxy)-
  • Distillates (petroleum), hydrotreated light

A Nalco spokesman claims that “Both COREXIT dispersants have been approved by the EPA as part of the National Contingency Plan for treating oil spills.” What they don’t bother to mention is the circumstances for which they are approved, and that the approved dispersal method does NOT allow for it to be used sub-surface. In fact, as we reported earlier in this ecological disaster, the EPA and BP are specifically prohibited from using it in that fashion by the Clean Water Act of 1972. (CWA) Read more