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Where Have All The Whalers Gone?

Seriously. As late as the 1970’s, Australia and the United States were amongst the whaling nations. After even the International Whaling Commission (IWC), which is a pro-whaling organization, called for a moratorium on killing whales, nearly all nations stopped the activity.

Picture of whaling in times past

Back when it was harder to kill a whale, we weren’t as much of a threat to them… or ourselves.

Why? What changed? We became to clever, too capable of killing. Where once it was a dangerous and courageous act to go out into the oceans in pursuit of a whale, perhaps kill one or two, men developed power boats and explosive-charged harpoons fired from 50-caliber guns… and the whale populations went from millions to a few hundred thousand in half a century.

Her Deepness, Dr. Sylvia Earle, describes the scenario in her book, “The World Is Blue (How our fate and the oceans’ are one).”  After millions of years of being the apex predator, the supreme beings of the sea, along comes man, figures out how to make things (fuel and gunpowder) explode, and throws off the entire natural order of things in the ocean by invading their world, by killing off beings as smart and long-lived as we are, as though they were a prey species. Read more

Oh Impotent We!

Protect The Ocean began writing about (and campaigning against) the use of Corexit within 2 days of BP’s use of it.  Corexit is the real culprit, you see, far more deadly than the oil itself, and the plot far more nefarious than most expect.  The use of Corexit was calculated, both in advance (as their unofficial Contingency Plan) and as the containment attempts and cleanups began.
Corexit had been banned in the UK for a decade already.  Accordingly British Petroleum knew good and well that  the results of using Corexit would not be good.  But it goes further than that.  The head of Nalco (which sells Corexit) used to be on the board of BP. When oil was soaking the Gulf’s shores, other less toxic agents were offered up.  BP categorically decline each and every one of them, continuing to stick with their cronie’s product.  Amongst the results was that they paid one of their own nearly $30 a gallon for 1.4 MILLION gallons (some say more like 2 million gallons, eventually,) of the lethal stuff. Read more

The Contract For The Ady Gil

PREFACE: Protect The Ocean is about the ocean and its inhabitants, the ways we affect them, and the ways in which their well-being affects us all.  That’s our purpose and focus.

The enmity between Pete Bethune and Paul Watson, founder of Sea Shepherd Conservation Society (SSCS) has simply gone on too long, and there are far too many claims, counter-claims, and rumours being bandied about.  It’s dividing ocean activists, and a continued source of dissent.  We will not take sides.  It is PTO’s job to report the facts, the truths we find.

Pete Bethune has provided us with a copy of the contract with Sea Shepherd Conservation Society for the use of the Earthrace, (which was rechristened as the Ady Gil, in appreciation of Ady Gil’s contribution of one million dollars to assist in acquiring her.)  We have provided this document (Click here to download the ADY GIL CHARTER AGREEMENT) so that people can see for themselves what the truth is.

NOTE: Pete explains that Ady Gil owned Earthrace Limited at this point in time.  The contract specifies that the $500k is to be paid to Pete if the vessel is lost or destroyed, or if the damage was greater than a certain sum:

Clip from the contract indicating that Pete gets $500k

Sections 11 and 12 of the contract demonstrate SSCS's responsibility to be limited to $500k

We have been informed that Pete Bethune has required that binding arbitration proceed, as required by the contract, and that Paul Watson is uncooperative in facilitating that the arbitration hearings occur as agreed.

We would like to point out that any counter-claim by Sea Shepherd, (such as Paul Watson’s claim of financial losses suffered on behalf of volunteer Pete Bethune) would be a separate matter, outside the scope of this contract.  Watson’s claims may or may not have merit, but the order of events clearly shows that SSCS should have paid Pete $500k at the time of loss.  While SSCS is free to pursue civil charges against Bethune, that does not release them from the obligation to first pay the sum owed to Bethune under this agreement.

Protect The Ocean hopes that these champions of the sea will soon be able to put this behind them, so they can focus all of their attention on the essential work of saving whales from being killed, and of protecting the ocean.